Aimless In Space

My own suspicion is that the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.
--J.B.S. Haldane--


Rachael - Detroit - WSU

Mad Scientist-in-Training

Clastrophysicist (Classics/Astronomy/Physics)

This is my super spectacular (mostly) space blog!! I also blog cats, science, math, Doctor Who, Supernatural, Cowboy Bebop, Fullmetal Alchemist, Howl's Moving Castle, Samurai Champloo, Legend of Zelda, Rurouni Kenshin, jellyfish, Detroit, Futurama, and whatever else happens to delight me!
Recent Tweets @aimlessinspace
Things I Like!
People I Like!

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters -  Five Great Mathematicians And Their Contributions.

(via aluminothermic)

compoundchem:

Nice graphic from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions page to mark the 45th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing.

(via aluminothermic)

afro-dominicano:

Earth’s Siblings: Inside The Planets

Click each for a neat and informative view of the neighboring planets in our Solar System.

via SPACE

(via afro-dominicano)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Hercules NGC 6210

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has taken a striking high resolution image of the curious planetary nebula NGC 6210. Located about 6500 light-years away, in the constellation of Hercules, NGC 6210 was discovered in 1825 by the German astronomer Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve. Although in a small telescope it appears only as a tiny disc, it is fairly bright.

NGC 6210 is the last gasp of a star slightly less massive than our Sun at the final stage of its life cycle. The multiple shells of material ejected by the dying star form a superposition of structures with different degrees of symmetry, giving NGC 6210 its odd shape. This sharp image shows the inner region of this planetary nebula in unprecedented detail, where the central star is surrounded by a thin, bluish bubble that reveals a delicate filamentary structure. This bubble is superposed onto an asymmetric, reddish gas formation where holes, filaments and pillars are clearly visible.

The life of a star ends when the fuel available to its thermonuclear engine runs out. The estimated lifetime for a Sun-like star is some ten billion years. When the star is about to expire, it becomes unstable and ejects its outer layers, forming a planetary nebula and leaving behind a tiny, but very hot, remnant, known as white dwarf. This compact object, here visible at the centre of the image, cools down and fades very slowly. Stellar evolution theory predicts that our Sun will experience the same fate as NGC 6210 in about five billion years.

Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Whirlpool Galaxy

Image Credit: Jim Collins

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

s-c-i-guy:

Titan’s Halo

With its thick, distended atmosphere, Titan’s orange globe shines softly, encircled by a thin halo of purple light-scattering haze. 

This composite image was created using taken using blue, green and red spectral filters to create this enhanced-color view; the color images were combined with an ultraviolet view that makes the high-altitude, detached layer of haze visible. The ultraviolet part of the composite image was given a purplish hue to match the bluish-purple color of the upper atmospheric haze seen in visible light. 

Small particles that populate high hazes in Titan’s atmosphere scatter short wavelengths more efficiently than longer visible or infrared wavelengths, so the best possible observations of the detached layer are made in ultraviolet light. 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute 

source

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

thecosmosmadeconscious:

In March 2003, Saturn’s rings were at maximum tilt toward Earth, a special event occurring every 15 years. With the rings fully tilted, astronomers get the best views of the planet’s Southern Hemisphere. They took advantage of the rings’ unique alignment by using Hubble to capture some stunning images.
Credit: NASA, ESA, E. Karkoschka, G. Bacon (STScI)

thecosmosmadeconscious:

In March 2003, Saturn’s rings were at maximum tilt toward Earth, a special event occurring every 15 years. With the rings fully tilted, astronomers get the best views of the planet’s Southern Hemisphere. They took advantage of the rings’ unique alignment by using Hubble to capture some stunning images.

Credit: NASA, ESA, E. Karkoschka, G. Bacon (STScI)

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

spaceplasma:

Coronal rain

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

Credit: NASA,SDO

spaceplasma:

Coronal rain

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

Credit: NASA,SDO

(via scienceshenanigans)