Aimless In Space

My own suspicion is that the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.
--J.B.S. Haldane--


Rachael - Detroit - WSU

Mad Scientist-in-Training

Clastrophysicist (Classics/Astronomy/Physics)

This is my super spectacular (mostly) space blog!! I also blog cats, science, math, Doctor Who, Supernatural, Cowboy Bebop, Fullmetal Alchemist, Howl's Moving Castle, Samurai Champloo, Legend of Zelda, Rurouni Kenshin, jellyfish, Detroit, Futurama, and whatever else happens to delight me!
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I am President of Wayne State University’s Society of Physics Students for the 2014-2015 school year!

Neat!

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distant-traveller:

The El Gordo massive galaxy cluster

It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al.

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insanelygaming:

The Hero of Time

Created by Milli-Jane

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spaceplasma:

Archive: Apollo 11 Views Earth (NASA, Marshall, 07/16/69)

July 16, 1969: The Earth photographed by the Apollo 11 crew on their first day in orbit.

Image credit: NASA

myartexperiments:

Happy Earth Day

policymic:

How many Earth twins are out there? Hundreds possibly

NASA’s recent discovery of Kepler-186f, the first habitable Earth-sized planet is big news in humankind’s long search for extraterrestrial life.

A universe full of exoplanets: Thanks to the Kepler Space Telescope, which was launched in 2009 to hunt planets across the universe, we’ve managed to find around 1800 exoplanets so far, many of which have been discovered in just the last year or so.

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